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Sales were down 11% in Saskatoon (going from 539 to 480), up 67% in Martensville (going from 15 to 25), and down 42% in Warman (going from 43 to 25). In Humboldt, sales were down 37% (going from 19 to 12), while in the larger region, sales were down 14% (going from 756 to 653). Sales in Saskatoon were 23% above the 5-year average (and 18% above the 10-year average), 76% above the 5-year average (and 32% above the 10-year average) in Martensville, and 3% below the 5-year average (and 6% below the 10-year average) in Warman. In Humboldt, sales were 20% above the 5-year average (and 7% above the 10-year average), while in the larger region, sales were 21% above the 5-year average (and 17% above the 10-year average). Year-to-Date (YTD) sales in Saskatoon rose 47% over last year (increasing from 2,317 to 3,407), rose 56% in Martensville (increasing from 106 to 165), and rose 48% in Warman (increasing from 143 to 211). Year-to-Date (YTD) sales in Humboldt rose 53% over last year (increasing from 19 to 12), while YTD sales in the larger region rose 46% (going from 3,208 to 4,686).


Sales volume was down 10% in the Saskatoon, going from $191.5M to $172.5M in 2021 (27% above the 5-year average, and 23% above the 10-year average). In Martensville, sales volume was up 86%, going from $4.8M to $8.9M (94% above the 5-year average, and 47% above the 10-year average) and in Warman, sales volume was down 44%, going from $17.1M to $8.9M (7% below the 5-year average, and 7% below the 10-year average). Sales volume was down 33% in Humboldt, going from $3.9M to $2.6M (14% above the 5-year average, and 6% above the 10-year average), while in the region, sales volume was down 13%, going from $258.4M to $225.6M (28% above the 5-year average, and 24% above the 10-year average). YTD sales volume in Saskatoon was $1,247.6M (an increase of 57% from last year), $56.2M in Martensville (an increase of 94% from last year), and $54.0M in Warman (an increase of 52% from last year). YTD sales volume in Humboldt was $20.9M (an increase of 60% from last year), while in the region, YTD sales volume was $1,638.5M (an increase of 57% from last year).


In Saskatoon, the number of new listings in July 2021 fell 7.5%, going from 819 to 758 (2.7% below the 5-year average and 4.5% below the 10-year average). The number of new listings fell 20.7% in Martensville, going from 29 to 23 (39.7% below the 5-year average and 40.1% below the 10-year average) and fell 29.7% in Warman, going from 37 to 23 (48.2% below the 5-year average and 49.8% below the 10-year average). In Humboldt, the number of new listings fell 42.4%, going from 33 to 19 (20.8% below the 5-year average and 15.6% below the 10-year average), while in the region, new listings fell 13.9%, going from 1,206 last year to 1,039 this year (9.1% below the 5-year average and 10.1% below the 10-year average). YTD new listings in Saskatoon rose 23.2% (going from 4,541 to 5,596), rose 29.0% in Martensville (going from 179 to 231), and rose 8.6% in Warman (going from 256 to 278). In Humboldt, YTD new listings fell 25.3% (going from 162 to 121), while in the larger region, the number of new listings to date rose 14.9%, going from 6,621 to 7,608. Active listings fell 0.1% in Saskatoon (down from 2,387 to 2,385), fell 11.8% in Martensville (down from 110 to 97), fell 19.6% in Warman (down from 138 to 97), fell 28.6% in Humboldt (down from 112 to 80), and fell 8.9% in the region (down from 3,947 to 3,595).


Months of supply in Saskatoon stood at 5.0 months (which is 12.2% above the level last year and 34.3% below the 5-year average), while the sales to listing ratio was 63.3%, suggesting that market conditions are balanced. Months of supply in Martensville stood at 3.9 months (which is 47.1% below the level last year and 64.7% below the 5-year average), while the sales to listing ratio was 108.7%, suggesting that market conditions favour sellers. Months of supply in Warman stood at 3.9 months (which is 38.4% above the level last year and 51.5% below the 5-year average), while the sales to listing ratio was 108.7%, suggesting that market conditions favour sellers. Months of supply in Humboldt stood at 6.7 months (which is 13.1% above the level last year and 55.1% below the 5-year average), while the sales to listing ratio was 63.2%, suggesting that market conditions are balanced. Months of supply in the larger region stood at 5.5 months (which is 5.5% above the level last year and 38.3% below the 5-year average), while the sales to listing ratio was 62.9%, suggesting that market conditions are balanced.


Homes in Saskatoon stayed on the market an average of 41 days in July, down 3.2% from 42 days last year (but below the 5-year average of 49 days and below the 10-year average of 43 days). Homes in Martensville stayed on the market an average of 45 days, down 54.1% from 99 days last year (but below the 5-year average of 77 days and below the 10-year average of 65 days) while homes in Warman stayed on the market an average of 45 days, down 33.8% from 68 days last year (but below the 5-year average of 56 days and below the 10-year average of 57 days). Humboldt saw Homes stay on the market an average of 123 days, up 82.8% from 67 days last year (and above the 5-year average of 85 days and above the 10-year average of 84 days), and homes in the region were on the market an average of 47 days, also down from an average of 54 days last year (and 19.9% below the 5-year average).

The MLS® Home Price Index (HPI)—a more accurate measure of house price trends—varied across different centres in the region. Saskatoon saw the residential benchmark price rise 8.6% year-over-year, going from $305,100 to $331,400. The residential benchmark price in Martensville rose 11.4% (going from $359,400 to $400,400) and rose by 11.8% in Warman (going from $371,100 to $400,400). The residential benchmark price in Humboldt rose 8.4% (going from $193,800 in 2020 to $210,000 this year).


The Saskatchewan Realtors® Association (SRA) provides leadership and services that support 1,500 Realtors in Saskatchewan through technology, education, and advocacy. SRA is also the provincial trusted voice invested in bringing expert insight to public policy makers on matters that affect growth, housing, real estate, and the creation of wealth in our communities. For more information, visit: www.saskatchewanrealtorsassociation.ca and www.realtors.ca.

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July 08, 2021

The Saskatchewan real estate market remains strong. Across the province, there were 1,914 homes sold (up over almost 12% from last June and up 65.7% year-to-date, going from 5,690 to 9,427), new listings were down 2.6% (but up 20.0% year-to-date, going from 2,174 to 2,608) and the MLS® Home Price Index (HPI) composite was up 9.8% (up 8.9% year-to-date, going from $262,700 to $288,500). Inventories—a measure of how many months until there are no active listings given current sales levels— were also down in 23 of the 24 markets that the SRA tracks.


“The market continues to level off from the highs seen earlier this year,” said Chris Guérette, SRA’s CEO. This month-over-month leveling off in activity is expected and is being seen across the country. “As more people get their COVID vaccines and the economy continues to open up, people’s spending decisions are going to include things other than housing,” said Guérette, “and that’s going to temper demand somewhat. But so far, market activity remains positive.”


Some policy makers had hoped that the new mortgage rules that came into effect June 1 would help to moderate demand; “It’s still too early to tell what the full impact of the tighter mortgage rules will be, but they don’t seem to have had any real impact on Saskatchewan markets,” said Guérette. Across the province, sales were still up nearly 18% and prices were up almost 10%, while the changes introduced in 2018 saw both sales and prices fall. According to Guérette, ”the jump in sales and drop in inventory despite efforts to cool the market suggests that the market is still quite strong and that if we want to see prices moderate, policy efforts should be aimed at increasing supply rather than trying stifle demand.”

Saskatoon and Region (including Martensville, Warman, and Humboldt)

Sales were up 18.3% in Saskatoon (going from 513 to 607), up 36.0% in Martensville (going from 25 to 34), and up 23.5% in Warman (going from 34 to 42). In Humboldt, sales were up 16.7% (going from 12 to 14), while in the larger region, sales were up 15.8% (going from 716 to 829). Sales in Saskatoon were 35.8% above the 5-year average (and 33.3% above the 10-year average), 47.8% above the 5-year average (and 61.1% above the 10-year average) in Martensville, and 62.8% above the 5-year average (and 50.5% above the 10-year average) in Warman. In Humboldt, sales were 34.6% above the 5-year average (and 38.6% above the 10-year average), while in the larger region, sales were 35.1% above the 5-year average (and 34.2% above the 10-year average). Year-to-Date (YTD) sales in Saskatoon rose 65.3% over last year (increasing from 1,774 to 2,933), rose 51.1% in Martensville (increasing from 92 to 139), and rose 91.8% in Warman (increasing from 98 to 188). Year-to-Date (YTD) sales in Humboldt rose 97.5% over last year (increasing from 40 to 79), while YTD sales in the larger region rose 64.6%
(going from 2,453 to 4,038).


Sales volume was up 28.8% in the Saskatoon, going from $171.8M to $221.3M in 2021 (42.9% above the 5-year average, and 39.5% above the 10-year average). In Martensville, sales volume was up 48.6%, going from $7.3M to $10.9M (50.4% above the 5-year average, and 62.0% above the 10-year average) and in Warman, sales volume was up 29.9%, going from $12.4M to $16.1M (67.2% above the 5-year average, and 57.2% above the 10-year average). Sales volume was down 22.4% in Humboldt, going from $3.1M to $2.4M (9.0% above the 5-year average, and 1.0% below the 10-year average), while in the region, sales volume was up 26.2%, going from $231.1M to $291.7M (43.6% above the 5-year average, and 42.2% above the 10-year average). YTD sales volume in Saskatoon was $1,076.7M (an increase of 79.3% from last year), $46.9M in Martensville (an increase of 70.7% from last year), and $73.3M in Warman (an increase of 102.4% from last year). YTD sales volume in Humboldt was $18.0M (an increase of 103.6% from last year), while in the region, YTD sales volume was $1,413.0M (an increase of 79.7% from last year).


In Saskatoon, the number of new listings in June 2021 fell 0.5%, going from 829 to 825 (3.3% below the 5-year average and 4.1% below the 10-year average). The number of new listings rose 60.9% in Martensville, going from 23 to 37 (3.4% above the 5-year average and 4.1% below the 10-year average) and rose 0.0% in Warman, going from 45 to 45 (3.0% below the 5-year average and 8.2% below the 10-year average). In Humboldt, the number of new listings fell 10.5%, going from 19 to 17 (18.3% below the 5-year average and 18.3% below the 10-year average) , while in the region, new listings fell 8.1%, going from 1,228 last year to 1,128 this year (8.7% below the 5-year average and 9.8% below the 10-year average). YTD new listings in Saskatoon rose 29.9% (going from 619 to 804), rose 38.7% in Martensville (going from 25 to 35), and rose 15.1% in Warman (going from 36 to 42). In Humboldt, YTD new listings fell 20.9%


(going from 22 to 17), while in the larger region, the number of new listings to date rose 21.2%, going from 901 to 1,092. Active listings fell 1.6% in Saskatoon (down from 1,573 to 1,548), fell 10.1% in Martensville (down from 69 to 62), fell 40.9% in Warman (down from 115 to 68), fell 30.9% in Humboldt (down from 97 to 67), and fell 14.1% in the region (down from 2,842 to 2,442).


Inventory in Saskatoon stood at 2.6 months (which is 16.8% below the level last year and 39.9% below the 5-year average), while the sales to listing ratio was 73.6%, suggesting that market conditions favour sellers. Inventory in Martensville stood at 1.8 months (which is 33.9% below the level last year and 59.0% below the 5-year average), while the sales to listing ratio was 91.9%, suggesting that market conditions favour sellers. Inventory in Warman stood at 1.6 months (which is 52.1% below the level last year and 66.0% below the 5-year average), while the sales to listing ratio was 93.3%, suggesting that market conditions favour sellers. Inventory in Humboldt stood at 4.8 months (which is 40.8% below the level last year and 50.3% below the 5-year average), while the sales to listing ratio was 82.4%, suggesting that market conditions favour sellers. Inventory in the larger region stood at 2.9 months (which is 25.8% below the level last year and 45.1% below the 5-year average), while the sales to listing ratio was 73.5%, suggesting that market conditions favour sellers.


Homes in Saskatoon stayed on the market an average of 37 days in June, down 11.9% from 42 days last year (but below the 5-year average of 44 days and below the 10-year average of 41 days). Homes in Martensville stayed on the market an average of 51 days, down 13.6% from 59 days last year (but below the 5-year average of 59 days and above the 10-year average of 51 days) while homes in Warman stayed on the market an average of 34 days, down 52.8% from 72 days last year (but below the 5-year average of 52 days and below the 10-year average of 52 days). Humboldt saw Homes stay on the market an average of 100 days, up 53.8% from 65 days last year (and above the 5-year average of 85 days and above the 10-year average of 74 days), and homes in the region were on the market an average of 44 days, also down from an average of 54 days last year (and 15.1% below the 5-year average).

The MLS® Home Price Index (HPI)—a more accurate measure of house price trends—varied across different centres in the region. Saskatoon saw the price of the benchmark single family home rise 12.9% year-over-year, going from $293,700 to $331,500. The price of the benchmark single family home in Martensville rose 9.0% (going from $365,500 to $398,500) and also rose by 10.8% in Warman (going from $372,000 to $412,300). The price of the benchmark single family home in Humboldt rose 17.2% (going from $177,500 in 2020 to $208,000 this year).

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SASKATCHEWAN REAL ESTATE SETS MARCH SALES RECORD

Saskatoon and Region (including Martensville, Warman, and Humboldt)


Sales were up 108.8% in Saskatoon (going from 273 to 570), up 113.3% in Martensville (going from 15 to 32), and up 115.4% in Warman (going from 13 to 28). In Humboldt, sales were up 240.0% (going from 5 to 17), while in the larger region, sales were up 102.1% (going from 380 to 768). Sales in Saskatoon were 72.9% above the 5-year average (and 66.4% above the 10-year average), 102.5% above the 5-year average (and 82.9% above the 10-year average) in Martensville, and 35.9% above the 5-year average (and 15.7% above the 10-year average) in Warman. In Humboldt, sales were 107.3% above the 5-year average (and 136.1% above the 10-year average), while in the larger region, sales were 70.7% above the 5-year average (and 65.2% above the 10-year average). Year-to-Date (YTD) sales in Saskatoon rose 66.2% over last year (increasing from 722 to 1,200), rose 47.4% in Martensville (increasing from 38 to 56), and rose 91.7% in Warman (increasing from 36 to 69). Year-to-Date (YTD) sales in Humboldt rose 130.8% over last year (increasing from 13 to 30), while YTD sales in the larger region rose 66.1% (going from 984 to 1,634).


Sales volume was up 118.0% in the Saskatoon, going from $94.7M to $206.5M in 2021 (82.4% above the 5-year average, and 76.7% above the 10-year average). In Martensville, sales volume was up 113.1%, going from $4.8M to $10.2M (103.9% above the 5-year average, and 80.6% above the 10-year average) and in Warman, sales volume was up 122.3%, going from $5.1M to $11.4M (46.9% above the 5-year average, and 27.3% above the 10-year average). Sales volume was up 307.0% in Humboldt, going from $1.1M to $4.3M (118.4% above the 5-year average, and 150.0% above the 10-year average), while in the region, sales volume was up 114.4%, going from $124.9M to $267.8M (80.3% above the 5-year average, and 75.4% above the 10-year average). YTD sales volume in Saskatoon was $427.8M (an increase of 78.4% from last year), $18.5M in Martensville (an increase of 54.3% from last year), and $27.1M in Warman (an increase of 105.2% from last year). YTD sales volume in Humboldt was $7.3M (an increase of 180.9% from last year), while in the region, YTD sales volume was $556.9M (an increase of 80.5% from last year).


In Saskatoon, the number of new listings in March 2021 rose 53.8%, going from 602 to 926 (23.3% above the 5-year average and 24.0% above the 10-year average). The number of new listings rose 94.1% in Martensville, going from 17 to 33 (1.8% below the 5-year average and 12.2% below the 10-year average) and rose 37.1% in Warman, going from 35 to 48 (5.7% above the 5-year average and 10.4% below the 10-year average). In Humboldt, the number of new listings rose 73.3%, going from 15 to 26 (26.2% above the 5-year average and 33.3% above the 10-year average) , while in the region, new listings rose 47.1%, going from 855 last year to 1,258 this year (16.7% above the 5-year average and 16.3% above the 10-year average). YTD new listings in Saskatoon rose 23.4% (going from 547 to 675), rose 6.3% in Martensville (going from 26 to 28), and rose 4.7% in Warman (going from 36 to 37). In Humboldt, YTD new listings rose 31.6% (going from 13 to 17), while in the larger region, the number of new listings to date rose 17.5%, going from 784 to 921. Active listings fell 12.0% in Saskatoon (down from 1,454 to 1,279), fell 34.1% in Martensville (down from 85 to 56), fell 41.7% in Warman (down from 120 to 70), fell 8.8% in Humboldt (down from 91 to 83), and fell 21.2% in the region (down from 2,715 to 2,140).


Inventory in Saskatoon stood at 2.2 months (which is 57.9% below the level last year and 53.5% below the 5-year average), while the sales to listing ratio was 61.6%, suggesting that market conditions favour sellers. Inventory in Martensville stood at 1.8 months (which is 69.1% below the level last year and 71.0% below the 5-year average), while the sales to listing ratio was 97.0%, suggesting that market conditions favour sellers. Inventory in Warman stood at 2.5 months (which is 72.9% below the level last year and 55.3% below the 5-year average), while the sales to listing ratio was 58.3%, suggesting balanced market conditions. Inventory in Humboldt stood at 4.9 months (which is 73.2% below the level last year and 58.6% below the 5-year average), while the sales to listing ratio was 65.4%, suggesting that market conditions favour sellers. Inventory in the larger region stood at 2.8 months (which is 61.0% below the level last year and 55.2% below the 5-year average), while the sales to listing ratio was 61.0%, suggesting that market conditions favour sellers.


Homes in Saskatoon stayed on the market an average of 36 days in March, down 34.5% from 55 days last year (but below the 5-year average of 52 days and below the 10-year average of 47 days). Homes in Martensville stayed on the market an average of 40 days, down 39.4% from 66 days last year (but below the 5-year average of 57 days and below the 10-year average of 53 days) while homes in Warman stayed on the market an average of 60 days, up 200.0% from 20 days last year (and above the 5-year average of 52 days and above the 10-year average of 53 days). Humboldt saw Homes stay on the market an average of 107 days, down 51.8% from 222 days last year (but below the 5-year average of 145 days and below the 10-year average of 110 days), and homes in the region were on the market an average of 47 days, also down from an average of 66 days last year (and 24.4% below the 5-year average).


The MLS® Home Price Index (HPI)—a more accurate measure of house price trends—varied across different centres in the region. Saskatoon saw the price of the benchmark composite home rise 8.2% year-over-year, going from $290,500 to $314,300. The price of the benchmark composite home in Martensville rose 15.1% (going from $353,800 to $407,100) and also rose by 15.0% in Warman (going from $359,700 to $413,500). The price of the benchmark composite home in Humboldt rose 8.5% (going from $177,800 in 2020 to $192,900 this year).


Samantha Krahn


Director of External & Government Relations


Saskatchewan REALTORS® Association

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If you’re house shopping, there’s probably one question that’s been on your mind often: “What size home should I buy?” At a glance, the answer seems obvious: as big as you can afford! But that’s only a small piece of the puzzle. Home size matters on many levels from personal preference to resale value, future plans, your budget, and more.


How do you find the ideal home size for you and your family? Here are three things you need to consider:


The Truth About Square Footage

A foot is a foot, right? When it comes to the square footage of your future home that may not be the case. Measuring the size of a house isn’t incredibly precise. More often than not, the size will change depending on which appraiser is measuring and what mechanism they’re using to determine the square footage: measuring tape, laser measure, or eyeball. The reality is that there are no universal standards when it comes to measuring your home size.
What does this mean for you? You need to choose your home size not by the numbers but by the feel. Don’t put too much stock in the listing size on paper, but instead find out in person if each room, bathroom, and living area is large enough for your needs. It’s not about how other individuals answer the question, “What is a good sized house?” It’s about you, your family, and how big a place feels in person.


Your Budget
While your budget isn’t the only thing you should consider, it needs to be one of the critical factors in determining your ideal home size. And that may be little more complicated than you think. What matters when it comes to your budget?


Loan Size: The larger the house, the more expensive—most of the time. Make sure the average house size of your real estate listings fits with your pre-approved loan budget.


Monthly Budget: Large houses are expensive to keep up. As you increase your square footage expect to pay more in electricity, water, gas, cleaning, and more. If you have a tight allocation for monthly expenses, don’t go overboard on a large house without factoring in these other costs.


Your Future: Are you planning to have more kids? Do you need a new car? Are you counting on getting a raise at work? If you’re expecting your financial situation to change, make sure your home budget fits the modifications.
Your Preferences and Needs


Your Preferences and Needs
Your particular wants and needs should have the most significant impact on the home you choose. Make sure you’re truthful and honest with yourself about your expectations and needs. For example, if you eat out regularly and hate cooking, there’s no need to spend on a gourmet kitchen! You’d be better served looking for a home with a smaller kitchen and a bigger living room.



To help you determine your preferences, here are ten questions you should ask yourself:


1. Do you like small and cozy or do you need room to spread out?
2. How many people are in your family and how much space does each person need?
3. Do you have any hobbies or jobs that require extra space? (If you work from home, you’ll need an office. If cars are a passion, you’ll want a more substantial garage)
4. How often do you have visitors over? (If you have parties every few weeks and relatives visit a few times a year, you might want more space for guests)
5. Are you planning to have more kids or have an elderly relative move in with you?
6. What size of house have you been excited about in the past?
7. How much storage do you need? (Closet space and built-ins can be a big space saver)
8. How large is your furniture, and how much do you have? (If you have a king-sized bed, you want a big master bedroom)
9. What’s your five-year plan? (Upgrading your home to a larger size can be difficult; make sure the home you choose can last for years)
10. How much outdoor space do I want?


The key to purchasing the right-sized home for you 

you is being realistic. Make sure you really sit down with your family to discuss what you need, want, and can afford.


Source: Coldwell Banker Blue Matter

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Sales in Saskatoon were up 53.0%, going from 230 in February 2020 to 352 in February 2021, and up 59.9% in the overall region, going from 314 to 502. In Saskatoon, sales were 42.7% above the 5-year average (and 35.1% above the 10-year average), while in the larger region, sales were 50% above the 5-year average (and 43.1% above the 10-year average). Year-to-Date (YTD) sales in Saskatoon rose 40.3% over last year, increasing from 449 to 630, while YTD sales in the larger region rose 43.4%, going from 604 to 866.


Sales volume was up 69.0% in the city, going from $73.7M to $124.4M in 2021 (49.6% above the 5-year average, and 42.2% above the 10-year average). YTD sales volume in the city was $221.3M, an increase of 52.5% from last year. In the region, sales volume was up 57.4%, going from $183.7M to $289.1M (57.9% above the 5-year average and 51.3% above the 10-year average). YTD sales volume increased 57.4% in the region, rising from $183.7M in 2020 to $289.1M in 2021.


In Saskatoon, the number of new listings in February 2021 rose 15.8%, going from 468 to 542 (3.3% above the 5-year average and 5.0% below the 10-year average), while in the region, new listings rose 6.1% from 685 last year to 727 this year (3.5% below the 5-year average and 10.4% below the 10-year average). YTD new listings in the city rose 5.8%, going from 1,039 to 1,099, while in the larger region, the number of new listings to date rose 0.5%, going from 1,496 to 1,504. Active listings fell 21.6% in Saskatoon (down from 1,392 to 1,091) and fell 28.7% in the region (down from 2,618 to 1,867).


Inventory in Saskatoon stood at 3.1 months (which is 48.8% below the level last year and 50.8% below the 5-year average), while the sales to listing ratio was 64.9%, suggesting that market conditions favour sellers. Inventory in the larger region stood at 3.7 months (which is 55.4% below the level last year and 55.6% below the 5-year average), while the sales to listing ratio was 69.1%, suggesting that market conditions favour sellers.


Homes in Saskatoon stayed on the market an average of 43 days in February—down 40.3% from 72 days last year (but below the 5-year average of 56 days and below the 10-year average of 51 days). Homes in the region stayed on the market longer than homes in the city at 53 days on average in 2021, but also down from an average of 81 days last year (and 18.2% below the 5-year average).


In Saskatoon, the MLS® Home Price Index (HPI)—a more accurate measure of house price trends—was up 10.1%, going from $299,800 to $330,100.


Supplies by Chris Gbekorbu, Economic Analyst, Saskatchewan REALTORS® Association

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Some interesting facts…



1. Did You Know Most of the World's French Fries Come from New Brunswick?
New Brunswick-based McCain Foods makes one-third of all the frozen French fries produced in the world, and many come from a $65-million state-of-the art potato processing plant that's in Florenceville-Bristol.  The small town in western New Brunswick has taken on the moniker "The French Fry Capital of the World."  Not surprisingly, this is the location of the Potato World museum, and the heart of the mid-July National French Fry Day celebrations.


2. Did You Know Carleton Place Makes the World's Best Baseball Bats?
In 2012, more than 100 Major League Baseball players chose to swing Canadian maple wood bats - better known as the "Sam Bat". Sam Holman, founder of the The Original Maple Bat Corporation, invented the bat by choosing maple wood, a harder wood than the traditionally used ash.  So, if you see a professional player with a little logo on their baseball bat, that's one of the 18,000 sluggers produced each year in Carleton Place, a half-hour from Ottawa.


 3. Did You Know Saskatchewan Makes Most of the World's Lentils?   Mmmm, Lentils! Whether home or travelling abroad, order some lentil soup and odds are you're getting a little taste of home.  Canada is the largest exporter of green lentils in the world - about 1.5 million metric tonnes annually, with 95% of it coming from Saskatchewan.


4. Did You Know Scarborough Makes Most of the World's Halls?  If you pick up a pack of Halls you'll be getting another little taste of home since they are made in Scarborough, Ontario.  The plant at Bertrand produced more than 6 billion pieces of "medicine" for the U.S. Last year –  enough that if you lined them side-by-side they would circle the earth at the equator approximately 3.4 times.


5. Did You Know Winnipeg Mints Coins for Over 60 Countries?  Canada produces currency for more countries than you can imagine!  The Royal Winnipeg Mint produces coins for 60 different countries including Centavos for Cuba , kroner for Norway , and pesos for Colombia.  Currently the mint can produce over 20 million coins a day.


6. Did You Know Hamilton Makes the World's Swedish Fish?  Those chewy Swedish Fish sure weren't made in Sweden!   More than 5 billion of the colourful little candies are produced in Hamilton, Ontario every year –  that's all of the Swedish Fish consumed in North America.   Every day about 13 million of the little fish are produced at a factory in Hamilton, which also makes all Maynards Candy for Canada, and key brands for the U.S , including Sour Patch Kids.


7. Did You Know Toronto Makes the World's Best Racing Bikes?  Using the same tools and techniques as Formula One teams, Toronto-based Cervélo builds what have been called the world's fastest and lightest bikes.   At the 2008 Olympics in Beijing, athletes riding Cervélo bikes won 10 medals, while in 2008 Carl OS Sastre rode a Cervélo bike to win Le Tour de France.


8. Did you Know Winnipeg Makes Most of the World's Scratch Cards?  Walk into almost any corner store in the world for an instant win lottery ticket, and there's a good chance your scratch card was printed by Winnipeg company Pollard Banknote.  Founded in 1907, Pollard now has facilities throughout North America, however, a significant amount of its lottery scratch cards are still made in Canada.


9. Did You Know the World's Best Cymbals come from New Brunswick ?  Where do the cymbals used by Rush, Keith Harris of the Black Eyed Peas, the Philadelphia Orchestra and marching bands around the world come from?  The small village of Meductic (population 300), located along the Saint John River in southern New Brunswick.  SABIAN cymbals are sold in 120 countries around the world.


10. Did You Know Trenton Makes Tons of Dinos?  No, they don't make dinosaurs like in Jurassic Park , but close. Research Casting International, the leading company for constructing dinosaur remains (casting, restoring, mounting, repairing), is located in a 45,000 sq.ft. Airplane-hanger-sized building in Trenton, Ontario.  The company has created more than 750 of the mighty beasts for museums around the world.


11. Did You Know Kelowna Makes Most of the World's Water Slides?  When you slip down one of those clear tube water slides on a Disney Cruise, you're likely using Canadian design and technology.  Canada's Whitewater West Industries Ltd. Is the largest water parks attraction company in the world.  Their Kelowna, B.C. Facility, FormaShape, makes thousands of water slides each year.


12. Did You Know Peterborough is the Custom Aircraft Capital of Canada?  Flying Colours Corps. of Peterborough, Ontario doesn't make airplanes, but they sure make them special.  Entertainment systems, corporate logos, iPad-holders, custom exterior paint, upholstery, and they've even added a permanent bed in an aft cabin. Everything is custom made in-house, from the leather seats and wood trim to the side walls – for customers from across the globe,including much of Europe, the Middle East, Russia, Asia, and India.


13. Did you know B.C. Makes Tons of Submarines?
Atlantis Submarines, of British Columbia, actually owns more submarines than many countries –

but these ones are used for tourism.

The Canadian company initiated the world's first commercial tourist submarine in the Cayman Islands in 1986.

More than 10 million people have since experienced underwater adventures

in their 48 and 64 passenger submarines in the Caribbean and Pacific.

The subs they operate in Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Aruba, St. Martin, Cozumel, Curacao & Guam were all made in Canada.

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Sales in  Saskatoon were up 40.5%, going from 306 in October 2019 to 430 in October 2020, and up 42.6% in the overall region, going from 411 to 586.  In Saskatoon, sales were 32.5% above the 5-year average (and 30.5% above the 10-year average), while in the larger region, sales were 29.8% above the 5-year average (and 26.6% above the 10-year average). Year-to-Date (YTD) sales in Saskatoon rose 14.9% over last year, increasing from 3,168 to 3,641, while YTD sales in the larger region rose 20.1%, going from 4,258 to 5,114.


Sales volume was up 56.4% in the city, going from $96.7M to $151.2M in 2020 (38.9% above the 5-year average, and 33.5% above the 10-year average). YTD sales volume in the city was $1,260.3M, an increase of 20.1% from last year. In the region, sales volume was up 26.2%, going from $1,338.0M to $1,688.0M (38.1% above the 5-year average and 34.0% above the 10-year average). YTD sales volume increased 26.2% in the region, rising from $1,338.0M in 2019 to $1,688.0M in 2020.


In Saskatoon, the number of new listings in October 2020 rose 4.0%, going from 599 to 623 (5.1% below the 5-year average and 6.9% below the 10-year average), while in the region, new listings fell 2.5% from 857 last year to 836 this year (9.8% below the 5-year average and 11.7% below the 10-year average). YTD new listings in the city fell 3.5%, going from 6,992 to 6,744, while in the larger region, the number of new listings to date fell 6.2%, going from 10,245 to 9,610. Active listings fell 20.6% in Saskatoon (down from 1,729 to 1,372) and fell 25.6% in the region (down from 3,145 to 2,341).


Inventory in Saskatoon stood at 3.2 months (which is 43.5% below the level last year and 43.5% below the 5-year average), while the sales to listing ratio was 69.0%, suggesting that market conditions favour sellers. Inventory in the larger region stood at 4.0 months (which is 47.8% below the level last year and 43.4% below the 5-year average), while the sales to listing ratio was 70.1%, suggesting that market conditions favour sellers.

Homes in Saskatoon stayed on the market an average of 42 days in October—down 20.8% from 53 days last year (but below the 5-year average of 51 days and below the 10-year average of 46 days). Homes in the region stayed on the market longer than homes in the city at 50 days on average in 2020, but also down from an average of 63 days last year (and 16.4% below the 5-year average).


Median home prices in Saskatoon went from $302,500 to $330,000 (an increase of 9.1%) and were approximately 2.5% above the 5-year and 0.9% above the 10-year average median price. The MLS® Home Price Index (HPI)—a more accurate measure of house price trends—is up 0.3% from $322,700 to $323,600. Year-to-date, the median home price in Saskatoon was $331,065 which is 3.7% above the $319,300 price from the same time last year. Median home prices in the region went from $287,500 to $320,000 (an increase of 11.3%) and were approximately 4.8% above the 5-year and 3.4% above the 10-year average median price. Year-to-date, the median home price in the region was $314,252 which is 4.7% above the $300,110 price from the same time last year.

If you are wondering about the value of your property, don't hesitate to reach out to me for that conversation.  I would love the opportunity to "catch up" and provide you with current information.


* Above stats provided by Chris  Gbekorbu, Economic Analyst, Saskatchewan REALTORS® Association

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Saskatoon was the lone destination from the province to grace Vacay.ca’s top-20 list of “best places to travel” in Canada for 2020.


The digital magazine released its list on Wednesday with the Bridge City in the No. 16 spot.


Vacay.ca said it highlighted Canadian destinations that are at the forefront of environmental progress while remaining exciting places to visit.


“The travel industry is increasingly affected by consumers’ attachment to climate health and we believe consideration for the planet will significantly influence vacation choices in 2020 and beyond,” Vacay.ca founder and managing editor Adrian Brijbassi said in a press release.


“Our rankings spotlight locations that have become even more dynamic to visit because of their approach to confronting climate change.”


The report recommended visiting Saskatoon’s Remai Modern art gallery as well as the Broadway, Downtown and Riversdale neighbourhoods.


The city also offers more than 65 annual events and 200 parks.


“Saskatoon has so much more going on than meets the eye,” Vacay.ca managing editor Adrian Brijbassi wrote.


“Besides being a city teeming with parks, rivers, bike trails, and green areas, Saskatoon is also a historical gem and a culinary heavyweight with some of the friendliest people you will ever meet.”


The publication ranked Banff, Alta., at the top, noting the national park’s increased focus on sustainability and wildlife care. British Columbian locations appeared the most with seven on the list.


The rankings took two years to compile, according to the digital magazine.


Vacay.ca’s “best places to travel” in Canada for 2020:

  1. Banff, Alta.
  2. Victoria, B.C.
  3. Haida Gwaii, B.C.
  4. Toronto
  5. Havre-Aubert, Que.
  6. Fogo Island, N.L.
  7. Vancouver
  8. Penticton, B.C.
  9. Montreal
  10. Saint John, N.B.
  11. Haines Junction, Yukon
  12. Tofino, B.C.
  13. Niagara region, Ont.
  14. Quebec City
  15. Oliver & Osoyoos, B.C.
  16. Saskatoon
  17. Cape Breton Highlands National Park, N.S.
  18. Galiano Island, B.C.
  19. Charlottetown, P.E.I.
  20. Writing-on-Stone Provincial Park, Alta.
 
 Source: By  
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Saskatoon & Region

The Saskatoon housing market continued its 2019 trend toward balance last month, as REALTORS® listed fewer but sold more homes than in the previous November, reported the Saskatoon Region Association of REALTORS® (SRAR) Wednesday.


City listings fell 16 per cent to 451 from 534, as sales jumped 20 per cent to 243 from 203. Although the average price was down three per cent, to $333,295 from $343,361, dollar volume rose 16 per cent to $81 million, up from $69.7 million.


Including the surrounding region, new listings were down 12 per cent to 694 from 791, while sales rose eight per cent to 317 from 294 for a dollar volume of $102.3 million, up one per cent from $101.7 million.


In the region alone, including communities such as Warman, Martensville and Dalmeny, new listings fell 11 per cent to 159 from 179, and sales were down nine per cent to 58 from 64. However, the average sales price rose four per cent to $314,650, up from $301,490, for a dollar volume drop of five per cent to $18.2 million.


“It’s encouraging to see strength in sales and a slight decline in listings coming to the market, to keep it balanced,” said Jason Yochim, CEO of the Saskatchewan REALTORS® Association (SRA.) All Saskatchewan REALTORS® associations will amalgamate under the SRA banner in January, 2020.


Year-to-date numbers reflect similar trends. So far this year, and with only one month to go, Saskatoon agents have listed 7,443 homes to the MLS®, down three per cent from 2018’s 7,646, and sold 3,401, up seven per cent from 3,167. Sales are also up from 2017’s 3,286.


The average sales price of $331,457 is statistically the same as last year’s, bringing the dollar volume up seven per cent to $1.1 billion, up from just over $1 billion.


In the region, 900 homes have sold so far in 2019, down five per cent from last year’s 943, and listings have fallen three per cent to 2,789 from 2,874. Dollar volume is down eight per cent to $265.5 million from $289.8 million. The average price dropped four per cent to $295,141 from $307,352.


At the end of the month, Saskatoon had 1,534 homes on the market, down 11 per cent from 1,716 at the same time last year, while the region had 947 homes, down eight per cent from 1,032.


“It’s healthy for the market to see the number of active listings continue to shrink slightly,” said Yochim. “Two years ago, we were tipping over 2,100 at the high-water mark, so 1,500 is certainly good.”


* statistics received from SRAR, Jason Yochim, CEO of SRA

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As the weather cooled in October, residential sales in Saskatoon, Prince Albert and the Battlefords warmed over last year, the Saskatoon Region Association of REALTORS® (SRAR) reported today.


In the city of Saskatoon, sales rose seven per cent to 306, up from last October’s 285, helping to drive the dollar volume up five per cent to $97.5 million from $92.6 million. Listings also rose marginally to 599, up one per cent from 591. The average selling price fell two per cent to $318,450, down from $325,016.


Trevor Schmidt, interim CEO of SRAR, noted that the average five-year median sales price — $333,154 has not changed much over the past several years.


“This year, we’re tracking at the same level as the five-year average,” he said. “The market is neither high nor low; it has stabilized.


Another indication of stability in the Saskatoon market is the average length of time it takes to sell a home. Both in October and year-to-date, that average was 54 days.


“The five-year average is 55,” noted Schmidt. “Things have been quite stable considering what’s happened with the economy.”


“It shows the importance of using a REALTOR® to price properties according to what’s happening in the market, which helps foster a quicker sale.”


Year-to-date, 6,992 homes have been listed to the Multiple Listing Service® System (MLS®), down two per cent from 7,111 in 2018. Of those, 3,160 have sold, up seven per cent from 2,962, at an average price of $331,349 — statistically stable with last year’s $332,012. The dollar volume broke through the billion-dollar mark to $1.05 billion, up six per cent from $983.4 million last year.


In Saskatoon and area, which includes such communities as Dalmeny, Warman and Martensville, sales rose five per cent to 414, up from 393, in October. Year-to-date sales are up three per cent to 4,213 from 4,072, and also up from 4,099 in 2017.


Unit listings in the city and region fell two per cent to 889 from 904 last month, and also dropped two per cent year-to-date, ending October at 10,710, down from 10,895 in 2018. While the dollar volume was down two per cent in October, to $129.2 million from $132.4 million, the year-to-date volume is up two per cent to $1.365 billion from $1.342 billion.


The region alone saw a six per cent drop in listings, to 208 from 222, in October, and a seven per cent hike in sales to 88, up from 82 last year. Dollar volume in the region fell 13 per cent to $24.7 million from $28.5 million. The average selling price came in at $281,534, down 19 per cent from $348,038.


Active listings ended October down four per cent to 3,442 in Saskatoon and area, from 3,584 in 2018 and also down from 3,725 at this time in 2017. In the city, 1,712 listings were available, down five per cent from 1,808, and 1,020 homes were on the market in the region, down seven per cent from last year’s 1,095.


* statistics received from SRAR, Trevor Schmidt, Interim CEO of SRAR

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The first month of autumn had spring in its step as Saskatoon’s residential housing market saw increases in listings, sales and the average price, according to statistics from the Saskatoon Region Association of REALTORS® (SRAR).

Sales rose 14 per cent to 305, up from last September’s 267 and 260 the year before, while the average price was up 10 per cent to $351,741 from $319,534. 

Those factors contributed to a 26 per cent jump in the dollar volume of sales, which came in at $107.3 million — well up from $85.3 million last September and $89.5 million in 2017.

More homeowners decided to put their properties on the market, as well, listing 717 homes, up 11 per cent from 647 last year.

“The market is really balanced right now,” said Trevor Schmidt, interim CEO of SRAR. “With the sales to listing ratio being at 43 per cent, it indicates both sellers and buyers are able to come together and get deals done. It’s a good situation for both seller and buyer.“

"If you go back six months, the market has been trending toward balance.”

Year-to-date, sales in the city are up seven per cent to 2,855 from 2,677, while listings have fallen two per cent to 6,393 from 6,520. The average price of $332,762 is practically unchanged from last year’s $332,757.

In the region surrounding Saskatoon, including the cities of Warman and Martensville, sales were down 11 per cent to 76 from 85 in September while listings rose 14 per cent to 227 from 199. The average selling price, however, was up three per cent to $302,502. Dollar volume came in at $22.9 million, down eight per cent from last year’s $25 million.

Regional year-to-date sales are down five per cent to 755 from 797, and listings are down one per cent to 2,422 from 2,454. The average price so far this year is down three per cent to $295,187 from $303,636, and dollar volume has fallen eight per cent to $222.8 million from $242 million.

At the end of September, active residential listings in the city were down two per cent to 1,896 from last year’s 1,944. Listings in the region were also down two per cent to 1,143 from 1,161.


* statistics received from SRAR, Trevor Schmidt, Interim CEO of SRAR

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Saskatoon — Hot weather and summer holidays brought a slight cooling to Saskatoon
and region’s housing market, as sales and total dollar volume fell by 9.8 and 9.4 per cent
respectively from last July.


Multiple Listing Service® (MLS) sales totaled 481, down from 533, while listings rose a
marginal 0.4 per cent to 1,140. Dollar volume fell to $154.7 million from last year’s $170.7
million, reported the Saskatoon Region Association of REALTORS® (SRAR).


“Typically, people think summer will always be busy, but spring is the busiest market,” said
SRAR CEO Jason Yochim. “It tapers off a bit in summer. Winter weather can be brutal, and
people take advantage of summer when it’s here.”


Still, year-to-date numbers remain up over 2018. Sales rose 4.4 per cent to 2,968 from
2,843, while dollar volume is up 2.8 per cent to $964.7 million from $938.7 million. Listings
so far this year are down 2.2 per cent, to 7,724 from 7,900; and well down from 2017’s
8,692.


In the city of Saskatoon, July sales were exactly on par with last year’s 390 transactions
and well up from 310 in 2017. Dollar volume fell 1.7 per cent to $129.4 million, while
listings rose 5.5 per cent to 748 from 709.


Year-to-date, and largely due to a strong spring market, the city’s dollar volume is up six
per cent to $739 million from $696.4 million last year. Sales increased seven per cent to
2,228 from 2,081 and listings fell three per cent to 4,952 from 5,116.


Active listings in Saskatoon are down 5.7 per cent to 1,932 from 2,048 last year, while the
region’s listings are down 0.7 per cent to 1,213 from 1,221.


In July, the city’s sales-to-listings ratio reached 52 per cent, which is considered a balanced
market.


“Inventory levels are still declining, and that’s a good sign,” Yochim said. “The slight
decline over the last three years helps us maintain a balanced market.”


The city’s average price slipped 1.7 per cent to $331,780 in July. Year-to-date the price has
fallen one per cent to $331,649.

“It’s good to see in the city that while the average price dropped in 2017 and 2018, we’re
very close to those values, so it’s levelled a bit,” Yochim said. “Overall, it’s positive; it’s
stable. We’ve seen some good growth in Saskatoon in the last quarter. Our sales numbers
year-to-date are the highest in three years.”


The surrounding region saw less-robust interest from buyers. July sales dropped
nearly 40 per cent to 69 sales from last year’s 114, and dollar volume fell 35 per cent
to $21.5 million from $33 million. Listings were down 3.3 per cent to 291 from 301.


However, the region’s average sales price rose 7.5 per cent to $311,998 in July, up
from last year’s $290,322. To date, the price is down 5.2 per cent to $294,389.


Prince Albert and region saw a burst of activity in July, posting 75 sales for an increase
of 74.4 per cent from last year’s 43. That brings year-to-date sales to 345, up 5.8 per
cent from 326.


Dollar volume jumped accordingly by almost 49 per cent to $16 million, up from $10.8 million last year.

Listings were also up by 4.8 per cent in July to 152, but down by one to 1,052

year-to-date.


Average prices fell in both Prince Albert and region, by 12 per cent to $217,111 in the
city proper and 26.3 per cent to $190,991 in the region.


“A little pent-up demand finally kicked in, which is good. Buyers are seeing the
inventory they’re looking for to purchase,” Yochim said. “As you have lower sales, if it
starts to grow the inventory, you’re going to have more selection.”


The Battlefords region also saw an increase in sales, which rose 8.3 per cent to 39
in July and 2.7 per cent to 225 year-to-date. Dollar volume fell 19 per cent to $7.3
million from last July’s $9 million, and 14.4 per cent to $43.4 million year-to-date.


However, listings fell 12.6 per cent to 111 in July, and are down 10 per cent to 786
year-to-date. The average sales price is down seven per cent this year to $201,053.


Active listings are also down in The Battlefords by 11 per cent to 207, and “sales are
up over last year, so that’s a positive sign,” Yochim said.

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Sales rise 16 per cent from same month of last year


Saskatoon — A hot, dry May brought a warmer market for Saskatoon home sellers, as sales rose 16 per cent over the same month of 2018.

City sales came in at 422 units, up from 363 last May and 420 the year before, the Saskatoon Region Association of REALTORS® (SRAR) reported Monday. Sales are also up 10 per cent year-to-date at 1,469, up from 1,342 and 1,450 in the last two years.


“Sales have rebounded significantly this year, in large part due to an increase in condosales,” said Jason Yochim, CEO of SRAR. “Condo sales are up almost 21 per cent over
a year ago. Prices have been coming down, and they are very affordable compared to most housing types.”

Year-to-date, 449 condos have sold, as compared to 372 last year. Over the same period, single family home sales rose six per cent to 1,292, up from 1,215 last year. In May, single family home sales were up 13 per cent from last May.


As sales rose, unit listings fell three per cent to 911 in May, down from 942 in 2018 and 1,031 the previous year. Year-to-date listings are also down three per cent; so far, 3,422 homes have been listed to the Multiple Listing Service (MLS) as compared to 3,536 last year and 4,055 in 2017.


The higher sales resulted in a 17 per cent dollar volume increase over last May to $140.7 million, up from $120.5 million. That’s despite a two per cent drop in the aver- age selling price, which fell to $329,595 from $334,651.

“I suspect first-time home buyers have been very active this spring based on the con- do sales,” Yochim said. “When lower-priced homes sell, it has a downward effect on the average price.”


In Saskatoon and region, including communities such as Warman, Martensville and Dalmeny, sales rose 14 per cent in May to a three-year high of 561 units. Listings fell seven per cent to 1,386, down from 1,485 and 1,553 in the previous two years. Dollar volume rose 12 per cent to $181.3 million from $162.3 million last year. Yochim said, “The sales to listing ratio was 46 per cent in May, which is approaching a balanced market.”


In the surrounding region excluding the city, dollar volume was down 13 per cent to $31.5 million from $36.3 million. Listings fell 20 per cent to 317, after two years at about 390, and sales rose eight per cent to 113, up from 105 last May. The average selling price fell 19 per cent, however, to $279,095, after posting $346,130 last May.

Year-to-date, the surrounding region has seen a three per cent decrease in dollar vol- ume at $120 million; a three per cent drop in listings, to 1,344; and unit sales of 421, up nine per cent from last year.


As of the end of May, buyers had 3,164 listings to choose from in Saskatoon and area, unchanged from last year. Of those, 1,938 are in the city proper (down from 2,001 last May) and 1,126 are in surrounding towns and regions (down from last year’s 1,164).“We’re finally seeing some stabilization in the housing market, which has been in buyers’ market territory for some time due to oversupply and lower consumer confidence,”


 
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April house sales jump 18 per cent in Saskatoon regio

April housing demand in the Saskatoon region was the strongest in three years, as sales jumped 18 per cent over the same month of 2018.


The Saskatoon Region Association of REALTORS® (SRAR) reported 513 sales on the MLS® system, up from 433 last April and 414 in 2017. Those sales generated a dollar volume of $169.6 million, up 12 per cent from last year’s $152 million and 14 per cent from $147 million in 2017.


Year-to-date, sales are up seven per cent to 1,440, as compared to 1,342 in 2018 and 1,368 in 2017. Dollar volume is up three per cent to $460.2 million from last year’s $447.8 million. The spring market usually brings an increase in listings, and April followed that tradition. Listings rose four per cent to 1,295, although year-to-date listings are down slightly to 3,971 from 3,989.


Compared to the 4,475 properties posted in the first four months of 2017, however, listings are down significantly.

“People came out of hibernation and said, it’s time,” said Jason Yochim, CEO of SRAR. “We’re seeing the beginning of a spring market, which is nice.”


Other factors potentially influencing the market include stable interest rates and lower prices, he added.

“There’s less inventory and people are buying what they’re finding on the market,” Yochim said. “It’s feeling more like it’s time to make that move.”


In the city of Saskatoon, the number of properties brought to market actually fell two per cent in April to 774, down from 787 last year and significantly down from the 842 listed in April, 2017.

Year-to-date, 2,511 homes have been listed, down three per cent from 2,594 in the same period of 2018. Listings in 2017 were considerably higher, at 3,024.

April sales in the city proper came in at 380, up 14 per cent from last year’s 333 and generating a 16 per cent increase in the dollar volume, to $130.4 million. That figure is up from both 2018 and 2017, when $112.7 million and $113.6 million in sales were recorded, respectively.


So far this year, Saskatoon sales are up seven per cent to 1,047, up from 978 in 2018.

The average selling price in the city increased one per cent to $343,121 in April, up from $338,438 last year. Year-to-date, the price remains down by two per cent at $327,995.


The region surrounding Saskatoon, including towns and cities such as Warman, Martensville and Dalmeny, saw a whopping 25 per cent increase in dollar volume to $31 million on 105 sales, up 36 per cent from 77 last year. The average price was down eight per cent to $295,780.

Active listings in Saskatoon as of April 30 were down three per cent to 1,778 from 1,834 last year, and up four per cent in the region, to 1,083.


Stronger sales activity was reflected in Saskatoon’s sales to listing ratio, which at 49 per cent is considered a balanced market.

“It’s an encouraging sign,” said Yochim. “A balanced market offers a good equilibrium, with a good balance of buyers and product from sellers. Depending on how long it lasts, it helps slow the decline in pricing.”

New housing starts are down considerably, which is also affecting the market. March, for example, saw a 33 per cent drop in single family home starts and a 70 per cent fall in multiple units. It will take some time before the rising demand spurs more building, because there is always a lag between an improvement in sales and starts, Yochim said.

Prince Albert and region also recorded improved home sales, which rose 25 per cent to 60 units, up from 48 last year. Dollar volume jumped 26 per cent to $12.2 million from $9.7 million last April. Listings were up a marginal two per cent, to 168 from 165. In the city itself, sales were up 41 per cent to 38.

“That’s encouraging for P.A., because the market was quite depressed for a number of months,” Yochim said.

Activity was less robust in the Battlefords region. Sales rose 17 per cent in April to 35, up from 30 last April, but dollar volume dropped 35 per cent to $5 million from $8 million. Listings, however, fell seven per cent to 138.

Every market, including the strengthening Saskatoon market, comes with its own challenges for buyers and sellers, noted Yochim.

“If you want to know how the recent changes in the market affect your individual home and needs, it’s best to contact a SRAR member. They have the knowledge, experience and objectivity to help you make good decisions about your personal circumstances.”

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Month of March - Springing Up

After a fairly strong February, the city of Saskatoon’s March housing market had spring in its step as both new listings and sales rose over last year, by five and 11 per cent respectively.

The Saskatoon Region Association of REALTORS® (SRAR) reported 702 listings were posted to the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®), up from 668 last March, but significantly down from 850 in 2017.

Sales jumped 11 per cent to 258, up from 233 last year but down from 308 in March 2017. At the same time, the average selling price dropped four per cent to $316,445, down from just over $328,000 a year earlier, partly due to a higher proportion of entry-level home sales below $400,000. There was also a significant decrease in the number of sales recorded between $400,000 and $450,000.  Even so, the dollar volume of homes sold increased seven per cent to just over $81.6 million, up from $76.5 million a year earlier.
 
“We’re coming into the spring market, and the degradation of prices over the last three year has made it a little more attractive out there. People do get a little bit more optimistic in the spring,” said Jason Yochim, CEO of SRAR.

“Some of that optimism may have sprung from the federal government’s recent policy announcement regarding changes to home buyers’ plan, which provides a five per cent interest-free loan on existing homes, and 10 per cent on new homes, to first-time buyers. Our industry has been lobbying for changes such as this for a long time.”
 
The Saskatoon Region, which includes smaller communities in the Census Metropolitan Area, saw a five per cent increase in listings, to 1,084 (up from 1,034 in 2017) and a four per cent increase in monthly sales, to 359 (up from 345). Listings generally begin to trend upward as March, and spring, approach.
 
Excluding Saskatoon, regional listings were flat with last March and sales fell nine per cent to 77, down from 85. The selling price dropped 12 per cent to $275,000. In 2019 so far, Saskatoon and region listings, taken together, are down two per cent to 2,675, 1,736 of those in the city proper. Sales are up two per cent to 929, up from 909 in 2018, and dollar volume has fallen one per cent to $213 million, down from $215.5 million. Active listings sat at 3,184 at the end of March, down one per cent, with 1,611 of those in Saskatoon, down four per cent.

While the 2019 market has been kinder to home sellers than in the last three years, it remains important to price properties appropriately to present conditions, said Yochim. The sales to listings ratio was 37 per cent in March, which still signifies a buyers’ market.
 
“Home sellers, not to mention buyers, can benefit from the knowledge a REALTOR® brings to a housing transaction. REALTORS® know how to help a seller arrive at a realistic price, and they are also professionals who subscribe to a strict code of ethics. They can guide sellers, and buyers, through the process, and help them make the best decisions.”
 
OTHER REGIONS
 
The spring market has had a slower start in Prince Albert and region, where listings rose four per cent to 128 (from 123 last March) and sales fell 10 per cent to 38, down from 42.  Dollar volume was down 29 per cent to $6.7 million, from $9.5 million in the same month of 2018. However, the statistics tend to appear more dramatic to the smaller size of the market.
 
It was a similar story in The Battlefords region, where listings rose five per cent to 120 units, up from 114 a year ago, and sales fell three per cent to 32. However, that was a drop of just one unit from last year’s 33 sales.  Dollar volume fell 37 per cent to $4.5 million from just over $7 million. The region did, however, see an increase in the average price of four per cent to $188,000. Dollar volume was down 22 per cent to $4.5 million.

“The market is considerably more challenged in smaller cities. Saskatoon hasn’t been affected as much on sales activity because of our diversified economy.”

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February listings drop, sales rise in Saskatoon region

Despite the very cold temperatures in February, Saskatoon and region home sellers found a little warmth as new listings dropped seven per cent and sales rose six per cent. The Saskatoon Region Association of REALTORS® (SRAR) reported 731 homes were listed, down from 783 in the same month of last year, while sales rose to 296 from 280. The dollar volume of homes sold through the Multiple Listing Service (MLS®) rose four per cent, to $95.8 million from $92.4 million. Year to date, listings dropped seven per cent to 1,591, sales were up one per cent to 570, and the dollar volume was down a marginal one per cent to $180.8 million.


Excluding the region, new Saskatoon listings were down 8.6 per cent in February to 478 — the fewest since 2013 — while sales held steady with last year, rising by one to 211. Months of inventory dropped to 6.7 from 7.5 last February. City homes listed to date in 2019, at 1,033, are at their lowest level in nine years. February statistics indicate a change in a market that has been declining for four years. “Sales have stabilized somewhat, and inventory levels are coming down,” said Jason Yochim, CEO of SRAR. “As an optimist, I believe and hope it will continue. However, people have to be confident that the economy is improving before committing to the purchase of a home.”


He noted that while some sectors of the economy, such as potash mining, are doing well, others are less robust.

“It’s not that people aren’t working; they are. But they won’t upgrade unless they have confidence in their situations.”

The average price in Saskatoon also recovered slightly to $338,268, up 2.3 per cent from last February. Yochim cautioned that average prices can be misleading, because the basket of sales in any given month can be very different from another. For example, if two or three high-priced homes sell, that can significantly skew the average.

A better gauge, said Yochim, is the Home Price Index (HPI), which tracks prices over time based on a benchmark determined 15 years ago.


Saskatoon’s overall HPI, including apartment-style condos, was $282,600 last month, down three per cent from last year. The most expensive category, two-storey single-family homes, was down one per cent at $356,000.

Saskatoon remains a buyers’ market, with a sales-to-listing ratio of 44; but the ratio has risen from 34 in January, for a year-to-date ratio of 40. A ratio of 50 is a balanced market, while a ratio of 60 denotes a sellers’ market.

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YTD Home Sales Down 5%

December residential home sales on the Multiple Listing Service® system (MLS® System) in Saskatoon totaled 164 transactions, 20% fewer than December of 2017 which recorded 205 residential sales. The region surrounding Saskatoon had 43 MLS® sales in December of 2018, only one less than the previous December. The total annual number of residential home sales for 2018 in Saskatoon totaled 3,329 units. This is a 5% decline compared to the total number of home transactions for 2017. This represents the fourth straight year of a decline in annual home sales in Saskatoon. By comparison there were 4,417 MLS® sales in 2014, an overall reduction of almost 25%. There was no change in the total annual sales for the surrounding region with 986 residential MLS® transactions.

The total dollar volume recorded for residential MLS® sales in Saskatoon in December was $55.6 Million, down 20% from December 2017. The total dollar volume for the entire year reached $1.108 Billion, 8% lower than 2017. The combined dollar volume for Saskatoon and region for last year was down 4% from 2017 at $1.524 Billion.

Residential MLS® listing totals for the year continued to be lower than previous years. A total of 7,956 residential listings were recorded for Saskatoon on the MLS® System in 2018. This is an 11% reduction from 2017’s total of 8,969, representing over 1,000 fewer new listings. The five-year average for new listings in a calendar year in Saskatoon is 9,081. “Even though overall sales are down, fewer new listings has helped contribute to fewer properties available to buyers in the Saskatoon market.” comments Jason Yochim, CEO of the Saskatoon Region Association of REALTORS® (SRAR). The total number of active listings at the end of the year was 1,487, consistent with the five-year average of 1,480 available properties. The highest level of active properties was in July of 2017 when there were 2,210 active listings in the city of Saskatoon “Available properties will vary depending on neighborhood, price range and style.” cautions Yochim “some price ranges with still have a good supply to choose from while others will not. It’s important to remember that REALTORS® have the greatest access to available property” he adds. REALTORS® work in the market every day, subscribe to a strict code of ethics and are dedicated to developing professional standards and continuing education in the real estate profession. This is not the case for those who sell real estate in the province and who are not members of an association of REALTORS®. 

When it comes to home price trends, the best indicator of what is happening with home prices is the Home Price Index. The Home Price Index establishes attributes for a typical single-family home with a base value in 2005. From that starting point, changes in value are recorded over time to get a better sense of what is happening to pricing and where prices may be trending. The value for the typical single-family home in January of 2005 was $140,400. This value reached its peak in May of 2015 at $329,500. At the end of December, this value is at $307,000, down from $310,900 in November. This value is virtually unchanged from a year ago, however, it has been trending downward since the middle of 2018. For more information on HPI go to contact a member of the SRAR or visit saskatoonrealtors.ca .

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Home Sales Soften in November

The total number of residential home sales for the month of November in Saskatoon on the Multiple Listing Service (MLS®) totaled 203 units. This represents a 22% decline compared to the same month last year. The highest total for sales to the end of November was in 2014 reaching 4,203 transactions. This total has been steadily declining since with year to date sales at the lowest in ten years. At the end of last month there was a total of 3,167 residential MLS® transactions in the city, this is a 25% decline from the high of 2014. 


Total new residential MLS® listings has also been declining since 2015 when there were 9,411 by the end of November. The total number of residential MLS® listings for Saskatoon as of November 30thwas 7,646, a 12% decline compared to last year and a 19% decrease from 2015.  Total active residential listings at the end of last month was 1,716, comparable to the five-year average and slightly higher than the 10-year average of 1,388. At the current rate of sales, it would take just over 8 months to liquidate the current active listing inventory. “The months of inventory has been steadily increasing from 3.8 months in November of 2012.” comments Jason Yochim, CEO of the Saskatoon Region Association of REALTORS® (SRAR). “Even though homes in November were selling at 96.2% of the asking price, it still took two months for the average home to sell in Saskatoon” he added. The sales to new listing ratio helps to determine if it is a sellers or buyers’ market. It is considered to be a balanced market when the ratio is at 50%, a lower percentage than this is considered a buyers’ market and above, a sellers’ market. The sales to listing ratio in Saskatoon for November was 38%, favoring buyers. 


Typically, when referencing home prices, the focus in real estate is often on the average price. The danger in this is that the average can be misleading and is easily skewed. Case in point, if there are more, higher priced homes that sell in a certain period than another comparable period, the average will be higher. The opposite could occur the following month resulting in a lower average. A better indicator of what is happening with home prices is the Home Price Index. The Home Price Index establishes attributes for a typical single-family home with a base value in 2005. From that starting point, changes in value are recorded over time to get a better sense of what is happening to pricing and where prices may be trending. The value for the typical single-family home in January of 2005 was $140,400. This value reached its peak in May of 2015 at $329,500. Currently this value is at $310,900. Even though this is up 0.8% from a year ago, it has been trending downward in the past 6 months very slightly. For more information on HPI go to contact a member of the SRAR or visit saskatoonrealtors.ca 

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Number of Listings Declining

The total number of new residential listings in Saskatoon on the Multiple Listing Service (MLS®) year to date totaled 7,111. This represents a 12% decline when compared to the same period last year with 8,065 properties listed. The total number of residential listings for Saskatoon and region year to date is 10,929, a 10% decline from last year. The individual month end totals for new listings in 2018 was down each month as well compared to 2017 totals. This decline in new listings has contributed to lower inventory levels for available properties in Saskatoon. At the end of October there was a total of 1,808 active residential properties for sale in Saskatoon and 1,095 in the regional market surrounding Saskatoon. The five-year average for active listings in Saskatoon is 1,806 while the ten-year average is 1,487. “Since 215, the Saskatoon market has experienced higher inventories of active listings, this puts downward pressure on pricing and often upward pressure on the sales to new listing ratio.”  comments Jason Yochim, CEO of the Saskatoon Region Association of REALTORS®. The median price of a home in Saskatoon has declined as well since 2015 as has the average price. The average residential price was $332,000 at the end of October, down 4% from a year ago and $20,000 from two years ago. Although much focus in real estate is on the average price, the average can be misleading and is easily skewed. A better indicator of what is happening with home prices is the Home Price Index. The Home Price Index establishes attributes for a typical single-family home with a base value in 2005. From that starting point, changes in value are recorded over time to get a better sense of what is happening to pricing and where prices are trending. The value for the typical single-family home in January of 2005 was $140,400. This value reached its peak in May of 2015 at $329,500. Currently this value is at $312,600 virtually unchanged from a month earlier. The Benchmark price for a typical Townhouse style property in Saskatoon was $222,900 last month, for apartment style properties, $180,100 in October. For more information on HPI go to saskatoonrealtors.ca.


Year to date, the total number of residential sales on the MLS® system in Saskatoon was 2,964, down 2% from last year. For Saskatoon and region the total number of sales was 4,074, a 1% decline from 2017. Total MLS® sales of 285 in Saskatoon for October was unchanged from the same month last year and but down 9% from October 2016. “It s encouraging to see home sales at a comparable level to last year in spite of economic challenges and the “stress test” changes to financing earlier this year.” Comments Jason Yochim, CEO with the Saskatoon Region Association of REALTORS®. “It would seem that sellers are recognizing the importance of expert advice from our REALTOR® members in pricing to the current market.” he adds.

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